This Day In History

1755 Seven Years War. French fortress of Beausejour, on the isthmus joining Nova Scotia to the Canadian mainland, captured by British force which includes the 40th and 47th Foot (later 1st South Lancashires and 1st Loyals)
1815 Two days before Waterloo, the 30th Regiment (later 1st East Lancashires) earn high praise for beating off repeated attacks by French Cuirassiers at the Battle of Quatre Bras, despite having been marching and fighting for 2 days, without food
1915 4th South Lancashires, the Warrington Territorials, fight their first major engagement when they take enemy trenches near Hooge on the Bellewaarde Ridge, and later beat off the enemy’s counter-attack. The anniversary of this fight, which cost 276 casualties, was afterwards commemorated annually by the 4th South Lancashires with a ceremonial parade.
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The 1914 Christmas Truces

The unofficial truces which broke out all along the Western Front at Christmas 1914, the first Christmas of the war, have grown in myth and legend in the 100 years since, no doubt because people desperately seek any signs of grace and compassion in that most terrible of wars.

It has been estimated that over 100,000 men from both sides took part in the spontaneous events. Three of our antecedent battalions were on the Western Front at the time –  the 1st and 2nd East Lancashires, and the 1st Loyal North Lancashires – with the 1st East Lancashires being most directly involved.

On the 100th anniversary, our good friends at the Lancashire Evening Post newspaper told their story. Please click on the pictures below to get the full articles, reproduced here by kind permission of the Editor.

 

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