This Day In History

1914 2nd East Lancashires embark on the liner Dover Castle at Cape Town, under orders for Britain and thence to France. Battalion comprises 21 officers and 851 other ranks, with 5 officers' wives and 9 children, and 49 soldiers' wives with 73 children. Before they leave Wynberg Camp, near Cape Town, they carve the name of the Regiment and the dates of its 3 tours of duty there (1806, 1859-61, and 1911-14) into a large rock. Reportedly it is still there.
1918 In what proves to be their last major attack, 11th East Lancashires (the Accrington Pals) clear German strongholds to the north of Ploegsteert Wood and take 17 machine-guns, a field gun, an anti-tank gun and many prisoners at the cost of another 353 casualties
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Preston Pals Remembered

some years ago a letter in the Lancashire Evening Post asked why there was no memorial to the Preston Pals. It sparked local businessman Andrew Mather into action and on 22 July 2012, exactly 96 years less one day after D Company (the Preston Pals), 7th Loyals, suffered grievously in their first action at Bazentin-le-Petit, a memorial to their memory was unveiled on the platform at Preston Station from which they departed to war. The Museum provided enthusiastic support to the project, especially via our late, much-lamented Friend Joe Hodgson, without whose encyclopaedic knowledge the Memorial would never have come to fruition.

The Memorial

Preston businessman Andrew Mather, the driving force behind the creation of the memorial, outlines the history of the project.

Colonel Steve Davies, Deputy Colonel (Lancashire) of the Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, and Lord Shuttleworth, Lord Lieutenant of Lancashire, examine the memorial after the unveiling.

 

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