This Day In History

1918 Battle of the Selle. In a carefully-planned attack, rehearsed over 5 days, 5th East Lancashires mount a remarkably successful night assault near Briastre. They move off at 2 a.m., in a heavy downpour which lasted throughout the engagement, to the sound of the Regimental March being played by the battalion band. Met by heavy machine-gun fire and an artillery barrage which causes 50 casualties, they charge through with a yell and are on their final objective well before the 7 a.m. deadline set, taking 300 prisoners in the process. Casualties are 2 officers and 13 men dead, and 6 officers and 109 men wounded. Some 22 German dead were counted on the battalion front. Study of the ground the next day shows that the battalion had gone through no fewer than 6 defensive belts, including a very strongly-held railway embankment, before reaching its final objective. The 300 prisoners were ‘of far better physique and appearance’ than any of the enemy previously encountered, and turn out to be picked troops. They said that they were members of Kaiser Wilhelm’ bodyguard; that they had never before known defeat; and that they had been sent to hold the line at all costs.
We are funded almost entirely by voluntary contributions.

Please help by clicking the buttons below.

Please donate

Museum Pit Stop For Vintage Cars

Over 60 veteran, vintage and classic motor cars rolled into Fulwood Barracks on Sunday for a lunchtime pit-stop at the Lancashire Infantry Museum. They were taking part in the Lancashire Automobile Club’s 54th annual Manchester to Blackpool car run.

There was more than enough gorgeous machinery on display to make a grown man weak at the knees

Museum Friends members Tim and Barbara Dickson with their 1934-vintage Bentley. The car has been in the family since new

Museum Friends members Tim and Barbara Dickson with their 1934-vintage Bentley. The car has been in the family since new.

Morgan sports car puts its brolly up

Morgan sports car puts its brolly up

 

This delightful little Austin 7 has its own special history. In WWII it was owned by six successive Spitfire pilots, each of whom passed it on to the next. It has never been restored and its 700 cc engine recently passed the 400,000-mile mark

This delightful little Austin 7 has its own special history. In WWII it was owned by six successive Spitfire pilots, each of whom passed it on to the next. It has never been restored and its 700 cc engine recently passed the 400,000-mile mark.

 

Comments are closed.