This Day In History

1914 2nd East Lancashires embark on the liner Dover Castle at Cape Town, under orders for Britain and thence to France. Battalion comprises 21 officers and 851 other ranks, with 5 officers' wives and 9 children, and 49 soldiers' wives with 73 children. Before they leave Wynberg Camp, near Cape Town, they carve the name of the Regiment and the dates of its 3 tours of duty there (1806, 1859-61, and 1911-14) into a large rock. Reportedly it is still there.
1918 In what proves to be their last major attack, 11th East Lancashires (the Accrington Pals) clear German strongholds to the north of Ploegsteert Wood and take 17 machine-guns, a field gun, an anti-tank gun and many prisoners at the cost of another 353 casualties
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Lancashire Regiment (Prince of Wales Volunteers)

On 1st July 1958 the East Lancashire and South Lancashire Regiments amalgamated to form The Lancashire Regiment (Prince of Wales’s Volunteers).

In its short life the Regiment served in Hong Kong, Germany, Swaziland, Cyprus, and Malta. However it is justifiably best remembered for the distinguished role it played in 1967, during the final months of the bitter anti-terrorist campaign in Aden, where its officers and men received more operational and gallantry awards than any other unit.

On 25th March 1970 the Regiment amalgamated with The Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire), to form The Queen’s Lancashire Regiment.