This Day In History

1719 The Grenadier company of Wills' Regiment (later 1st East Lancashires), part of an expedition sent to capture the French-held Fort Annapolis, Nova Scotia, provide cover for the landing of the Marines. The French are allowing Annapolis to be used as a base for privateers attacking British settlements in New England.
1915 Battle of Loos. The final British offensive of 1915 begins. 1st Loyal North Lancashires make a gallant but unsuccessful assault in the face of uncut German wire, machine guns and gas. When, after a second attempt, the survivors rally in the trenches, only 3 officers and 159 other ranks remain on their feet, 16 officers and 489 men having fallen. It is in the aftermath of this attack that Private Henry Kenny earns the Victoria Cross. Also on this day 2nd South Lancashires make a brave but costly attack on the Bellewarde Ridge, but lose heavily to the lethal combination of machine guns and barbed wire.
1915 Private Henry Kenny, 1st Loyals, wins the VC near Loos, France, by going into No Man's Land on six separate occasions, and under heavy fire each time, to bring in wounded men
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Loyal North Lancashire

The Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire)

The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment was formed in 1881 as part of the Cardwell reforms of the British Army. Its title changed to The Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire) in 1921.

The Regiment was formed initially with two battalions, the 1st Battalion being created from the former 47th (Lancashire) Regiment of Foot, and the 2nd from the former 81st (Loyal Lincoln Volunteers). The Regimental Depot was at Fulwood Barracks, Preston, creating a link which has continued unbroken to the present day.

The Regiment recruited primarily from the towns of Central Lancashire, including Preston, Chorley, Bolton and Wigan.

During World War I the Regiment expanded to a total strength of 21 battalions. They served on the Western Front, at Gallipoli, and in Macedonia, Palestine, East Africa, and Mesopotamia. They were awarded a total of 80 Battle Honours. The Regiment suffered a total of 7590 casualties. Three members of the Regiment were awarded the Victoria Cross.

(For a detailed summary of the full part played by the Regiment in World War I, click HERE)

The Regiment was again expanded in World War II, to a total of 10 battalions. They served in North West Europe, Malaya, North Africa and Italy. One member of the Regiment was awarded the Victoria Cross.

(For a detailed summary of the full part played by the Regiment in World War II, click HERE)

On 25th March 1970 the Regiment amalgamated with The Lancashire Regiment (Prince of Wales’s Volunteers), to form The Queen’s Lancashire Regiment.