This Day In History

1719 The Grenadier company of Wills' Regiment (later 1st East Lancashires), part of an expedition sent to capture the French-held Fort Annapolis, Nova Scotia, provide cover for the landing of the Marines. The French are allowing Annapolis to be used as a base for privateers attacking British settlements in New England.
1915 Battle of Loos. The final British offensive of 1915 begins. 1st Loyal North Lancashires make a gallant but unsuccessful assault in the face of uncut German wire, machine guns and gas. When, after a second attempt, the survivors rally in the trenches, only 3 officers and 159 other ranks remain on their feet, 16 officers and 489 men having fallen. It is in the aftermath of this attack that Private Henry Kenny earns the Victoria Cross. Also on this day 2nd South Lancashires make a brave but costly attack on the Bellewarde Ridge, but lose heavily to the lethal combination of machine guns and barbed wire.
1915 Private Henry Kenny, 1st Loyals, wins the VC near Loos, France, by going into No Man's Land on six separate occasions, and under heavy fire each time, to bring in wounded men
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Museum Pit Stop For Vintage Cars

Over 60 veteran, vintage and classic motor cars rolled into Fulwood Barracks on Sunday for a lunchtime pit-stop at the Lancashire Infantry Museum. They were taking part in the Lancashire Automobile Club’s 54th annual Manchester to Blackpool car run.

There was more than enough gorgeous machinery on display to make a grown man weak at the knees

Museum Friends members Tim and Barbara Dickson with their 1934-vintage Bentley. The car has been in the family since new

Museum Friends members Tim and Barbara Dickson with their 1934-vintage Bentley. The car has been in the family since new.

Morgan sports car puts its brolly up

Morgan sports car puts its brolly up

 

This delightful little Austin 7 has its own special history. In WWII it was owned by six successive Spitfire pilots, each of whom passed it on to the next. It has never been restored and its 700 cc engine recently passed the 400,000-mile mark

This delightful little Austin 7 has its own special history. In WWII it was owned by six successive Spitfire pilots, each of whom passed it on to the next. It has never been restored and its 700 cc engine recently passed the 400,000-mile mark.

 

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